Painting the Door with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint

Like all poor bloggers, I forgot to take a before picture. But it was BAD. The white paint was chipping off our fiber glass door in large, hard, sharp, flaky chunks.

I had been dreaming of replacing our door with a wood-and-glass entry like this: 
From farmhousetouches.com

I’m always a fan of natural wood and traditional, simple style. I’m also a big fan of natural light. Since this side of the room faces North to a covered porch, an extra window would do us good! 

However, Mr. S (wisely) has insisted that we need to protect our privacy, and that our typical, tract home neighborhood isn’t the ideal setting for a view straight through to our home.

Also, this kind of door is a real budget buster. They’re expensive! 

So I decided to go with a classic black door. 

Source: Pinterest, uploaded by another user

While I haven’t gotten around to the outside, I really felt our interior needed the contrast most of all. 

I knew I didn’t want a true black, but more of a charcoal color. 

Then, a sweet neighbor gave me her left over Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Graphite as a surprise!

I wasted no time and got my door knocked out the next morning (my birthday). It took two coats to get all-over coverage, but three to get every last stubborn corner.

 This image has only chalk paint, and you can see the door is lovely and dark, and also matte (one of my favorite qualities of chalk paint). 

As great as it looked, I knew it would get some serious wear and tear, so I needed to protect this finish to make it more durable. 

I considered using Annie Sloan clear wax, but because this door gets intensely hot from exposure to our swampy Tennessee summers, I knew I needed to go a different route. 

I chose General Finishes High Performance Water Based Topcoat in the Flat formula from Then & Again Home Marketplace, the store where I work. 

I already had used this product to reseal my kitchen table and loved it. 


Even though I was carefully to use long strokes, the top coat dried and gave the appearance of short, choppy strokes. 

I poked around online and found that the chalk paint probably is absorbing the product unevenly before it dries, resulting in this spotty look. 

However, the great news is that this unsightly layer acted as a barrier for the next two. 

Here it is after two coats. A huge improvement! The imperfections you can see are actually present in the door itself, not a result of the finishes I chose. 

The topcoat dried pretty rapidly in my house, whose thermostat I set right at 70 degrees. I turned on the overhead fan after each application, and the process flew by. 

And finished! Such a huge improvement from chippy, flaking paint, way cheaper than a new door, and some much-needed masculine contrast in this space! 

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